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from pradhvan

I recently finished reading Python Testing with Pytest and I am glad I picked this up rather than jumping into the docs. It's definitely a good introduction for people who haven't had their share of testing a python codebase, let alone be with Pytest.

The book introduces a python CLI called Tasks and takes this as a base for writing all of its tests throughout the course of the book. Though eventually, the tests become more complex when you get into the latter half of the book.

The pros of the book are that it covers almost every section of the framework from fixtures, plugins, custom pytest configuration and even using pytest with tools like coverage and mock. But if you're someone like me who hasn't had his share of testing a python codebase you might find yourself with a bit of information overload at times.

I did find the book a bit of overwhelming on chapters like writing your own plugin, custom configuration and using pytest with Jenkins because these are the features that I wouldn't be using right out of the box. I would definitely be coming back to these chapters in the future if I need any of the features.

Overall the book is really well-written keeping in mind beginners who are just picking up pytest as their first testing framework and also for folks who are moving towards pytest from any other testing framework. Exercises at the back of every chapter make sure you also get some hands-on experience of writing tests.

Just a personal tip for anyone who is picking this up and has less experience with pytest. Feel free to skip chapters or skim chapters that aren't useful right out of the box. You can always come back to them when you need those features.

 
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from pradhvan

2019 has been a year of new beginnings both personally and professionally. This was the year I got my first job, the first salary and on the contrary to that, I did give my first resignation. Yeah, that was fun!

This blog just highlights most of the things I did in the previous year.

Blog Posts

I did post out 8 blogs this year. I know it's not that much. Initially, I had planned one blog a month. But by the end of the year during the time I was giving interviews for the new job things started to fall and I could not commit to one blog a month.

The plan for this year is to blog more or at least be consistent with writing. Stick to at least one blog per month.

Books

The previous year was a good reading year compared to the last few years. The Kindle I bought came real handy during the long metro rides. Plus I got some tech books cheap compared to their paperback prices so I did finish some of them too.

This year I started to take up reading non-tech books a bit more seriously. So I am picking up a book a month and finishing it slowly. Keeping in consideration that the book is less than 800-1000 pages for the initial months just to help in making a momentum.

Recently finished Parliamental and will be moving to The Elephant Vanishes.

Talks

I did give one talk at PyConf Hyderabad 2019 one of my favorite regional conferences in India. I also did submit one for a PyDelhi meetup but sadly by the time, it was scheduled I had already relocated. More on that later.

Open Source Contributions

One of the major things that I want to work towards this year is towards making more upstream contributions.

Last year I did submit two document patches to one org aio-libs . The project was aiopg, async version of Postgres but that happened by sheer luck. As I was going through the documentation I found some of the documentation to be using old-styled decorator based coroutines instead of new async def function. So I submitted a patch to update them.

 
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from abbisk

Free Software

“Free” software “is software that can be used, studied, and modified,” copied, changed with little or no restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form. Free software is available gratis (free of charge) in most cases. “In practice, for software to be distributed as free software, the human-readable form of the program (the source code) must be made available” along “ with a notice granting the” user permission to further adapt the code and continue its redistribution for free. This notice either grants a “free software license”, or releases the source code into the public domain.

Open-Source Software

In the beginning, all software was free in the 1960s, when IBM and others sold the first large-scale computers, these machines came with software which was free. This software could be freely shared among users, The software came written in a programming language (source code available), and it could be improved and modified. Manufacturers were happy that people were writing software that made their machines useful. Then proprietary software dominated the software landscape as manufacturers removed access to the source code. IBM and others realized that most users couldn’t or didn’t want to “fix” their own software and There was money to be made in leasing or licensing software. By the mid-1970s almost all software was proprietary “Proprietary software is software that is owned by an individual or a company (usually the one that developed it). There are almost always major restrictions on its use, and its source code is almost always kept secret.” users were not allowed to redistribute it, source code is not available users cannot modify the programs. Software is an additional product that was for sale In 1980 US copyright law was modified to include software In late 1970s and early 1980s, two different groups started what became known as the open-source software movement: East coast, Richard Stallman (1985), formerly a programmer at the MIT AI Lab, launched the GNU Project and the Free Software Foundation. “to satisfy the need for and give the benefit of ‘software freedom’ to computer users ultimate goal of the GNU Project was to build a free operating system the GNU General Public License (GPL) was designed to ensure that the software produced by GNU will remain free, and to promote the production of more and more free software.

 
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